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Wednesday, 1 April 2015

CERN researchers confirm existence of the Force - Posted by Cian O'Luanaigh on 1 Apr 2015. Last updated 1 Apr 2015, 17.42

Fifth force is not new for me, I have been writing about it since 2013


On 17th, Aug.’2013. I sent a manuscript in the journal “General Relativity and Gravitation” under heading 
"GRAVITY"- a PUSHING FORCE [-a "Layman concept of Unified Dark Energy"], it completely define the role of 5th force in gravitation [I have a pdf file sent by the journal on my submission].


The role of Dark energy is confirmed by ESA in March’2015 [pl. refer my comment in]


On 20th, March’ 2015, I have sent abstract for Vietnam conference in July on “Planetary Systems: A Synergistic View” after receiving mail from AAAS. This time again I have written the role of 5th force.

Apart from it my concept of “Dark Matter” got strength when NASA is saying which I have been saying since 2013.


My “out of box thinking” & the present Science comes on the same conclusion in many topics. In most of the time I have said first.


My 2nd OPINION on many topics where science feels uncomfortable are very important


My all comments in my blog & different in different international magazine, blogs, periodicals are the reflection of my “theory of everything – on the basis of Dark Atom & Dark Energy”




Researchers at the Large Hadron Collider just recently started testing the accelerator for running at the higher energy of 13 TeV, and already they have found new insights into the fundamental structure of the universe. Though four fundamental forces  – the strong force, the weak force, the electromagnetic force and gravity – have been well documented and confirmed in experiments over the years, CERN announced today the first unequivocal evidence for the Force. “Very impressive, this result is,” said a diminutive green spokesperson for the laboratory.
“The Force is what gives a particle physicist his powers,” said CERN theorist Ben Kenobi of the University of Mos Eisley, Tatooine. “It’s an energy field created by all living things. It surrounds us; and penetrates us; it binds the galaxy together.”
Though researchers are as yet unsure what exactly causes the Force, students and professors at the laboratory have already started to harness its power. Practical applications so far include long-distance communication, influencing minds, and lifting heavy things out of swamps.
Kenobi says he first started teaching the ways of the Force to a young lady who was having trouble revising for her particle-physics exams. "She said that I was her only hope," says Kenobi. "So I just kinda took it from there. I designed an experiment to detect the Force, and passed on my knowledge."
Kenobi's seminal paper "May the Force be with EU" – a strong argument that his experiment should be built in Europe – persuaded the CERN Council to finance the installation of dozens of new R2 units for the CERN data centre*. These plucky little droids are helping physicists to cope with the flood of data from the laboratory's latest experiment, the Thermodynamic Injection Energy (TIE) detector, recently installed at the LHC.
"We're very pleased with this new addition to CERN's accelerator complex," said data analyst Luke Daniels of human-cyborg relations. "The TIE detector has provided us with plenty of action, and what's more it makes a really cool sound when the beams shoot out of it."
But the research community is divided over the discovery. Dark-matter researcher Dave Vader was unimpressed, breathing heavily in disgust throughout the press conference announcing the results, and dismissing the cosmological implications of the Force with the quip "Asteroids do not concern me".
Rumours are growing that this rogue researcher hopes to delve into the Dark Side of the Standard Model, and could even build his own research station some day. With the academic community split, many are tempted by Vader's invitations to study the Dark Side, especially researchers working with red lasers, and anyone really with an evil streak who looks good in dark robes.
"We hope to continue to study the Force, and perhaps use it to open doors with our minds and fly around and stuff," said TIE experimentalist Fan Buoi. "Right now, to be honest, I don't really care how it works. The theory department have some crackpot idea about life forms called midi-chlorians, but frankly I think that poorly thought out explanations like that just detract from how cool the Force really is."
With the research ongoing, many at CERN are already predicting that the Force will awaken later this year.

NASA’s Hubble, Chandra Find Clues that May Help Identify Dark Matter - March 26, 2015, RELEASE 15-046

“Using observations from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found that dark matter does not slow down when colliding with itself, meaning it interacts with itself less than previously thought.”

SINCE 2013, I HAVE BEEN WRITING THAT DARK ATOM RARELY COLLIDE AT PRESENT CONDITION. I AM HAPPY THAT IN MARCH’2015 NASA IS SAYING THE SAME

MY OPINION ON 24TH,JAN’2015 under heading “Theory of Everything – on the basis of Dark Atom & Dark Energy” in

dark atom rarely collide at present terrestrial condition, because condition is now quite stable. It can be searched by creating unstable condition here or by doing experiment in unstable condition present elsewhere in universe or waiting for another disaster here.

SHREEKANT says: in

The location[condition] where we are searching ‘THE HIGH IMPACT OF DM’ IS CORRECT? Our atmosphere is now almost STABLE.

MY COMMENTS ON 22nd, Sept.’2014 in

- Collision of Dark matter will not give anything at normal condition. Normally they are readjusting itself.

- yes it includes leftover from the violent collision between dark matter & ….. , BUT CERTAINLY NOT BETWEEN THE PARTICLES OF DARK MATTER

“Dark matter is an invisible matter that makes up most of the mass of the universe. Because dark matter does not reflect, absorb or emit light, it can only be traced indirectly by, such as by measuring how it warps space through gravitational lensing, during which the light from a distant source is magnified and distorted by the gravity of dark matter.”

MY COMMENTS ON 22nd, Sept.’2014 in

- emitting or reflecting light is not only the way for making the things visible. We have to use special characteristics of dark matter & dark energy to hunt them. Present experiment is not upto mark.

“This means dark matter does not interact with visible particles and flies by other dark matter with much less interaction than previously thought. Had the dark matter dragged against other dark matter, the distribution of galaxies would have shifted.”

MY COMMENT on  20th , Oct.’ 2013 in

The dark matter interact white matter very weakly but continuously. It is not static it can move very fast depending on ….. It formed regularly at…. It play a very important role in all the phenomenon of our surrounding too.

MY COMMENT on  02nd , April’ 2014

Dark matter is not only distributed over all the places of the universe [including our surrounding] but also interacting with white matter continuously. Only sizes differ.

OTHER IMPORTANT LINK FOR MY COMMENTS:









Using observations from NASA’s Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory, astronomers have found that dark matter does not slow down when colliding with itself, meaning it interacts with itself less than previously thought. Researchers say this finding narrows down the options for what this mysterious substance might be.
Dark matter is an invisible matter that makes up most of the mass of the universe. Because dark matter does not reflect, absorb or emit light, it can only be traced indirectly by, such as by measuring how it warps space through gravitational lensing, during which the light from a distant source is magnified and distorted by the gravity of dark matter.
To learn more about dark matter and test such theories, researchers study it in a way similar to experiments on visible matter -- by watching what happens when it bumps into other objects. In this case, the colliding objects under observation are galaxy clusters.
Researchers used Hubble and Chandra to observe these space collisions. Specifically, Hubble was used to map the distribution of stars and dark matter after a collision, which was traced through its gravitational lensing effect on background light. Chandra was used to detect the X-ray emission from colliding gas clouds. The results are published in the March 27 edition of the journal Science.
“Dark matter is an enigma we have long sought to unravel,” said John Grunsfeld, assistant administrator of NASA’s Science Mission Directorate in Washington. “With the combined capabilities of these great observatories, both in extended mission, we are ever closer to understanding this cosmic phenomenon.”
Galaxy clusters are made of three main ingredients: galaxies, gas clouds, and dark matter. During collisions, the gas clouds surrounding galaxies crash into each other and slow down or stop. The galaxies are much less affected by the drag from the gas and, because of the huge gaps between the stars within them, do not slow each other down.
"We know how gas and stars react to these cosmic crashes and where they emerge from the wreckage. Comparing how dark matter behaves can help us to narrow down what it actually is," said the study’s lead author David Harvey of the École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) in Switzerland.
Harvey and his team studied 72 large cluster collisions. The collisions happened at different times and were viewed from different angles -- some from the side, and others head-on.
The team found that, like the galaxies, the dark matter continued straight through the violent collisions without slowing down much. This means dark matter does not interact with visible particles and flies by other dark matter with much less interaction than previously thought. Had the dark matter dragged against other dark matter, the distribution of galaxies would have shifted. 
"A previous study had seen similar behavior in the Bullet Cluster," said team member Richard Massey of Durham University in the United Kingdom. "But it's difficult to interpret what you're seeing if you have just one example. Each collision takes hundreds of millions of years, so in a human lifetime we only get to see one freeze-frame from a single camera angle. Now that we have studied so many more collisions, we can start to piece together the full movie and better understand what is going on."
With this discovery, the team has successfully narrowed down the properties of dark matter. Particle physics theorists now have a smaller set of unknowns to work around when building their models.
“It is unclear how much we expect dark matter to interact with itself because dark matter already is going against everything we know,” said Harvey. “We know from previous observations that it must interact with itself reasonably weakly.”
Dark matter may have rich and complex properties, and there are still several other types of interactions to study. These latest results rule out interactions that create a strong frictional force, causing dark matter to slow down during collisions.
The team also will study other possible interactions, such as dark matter particles bouncing off each other like billiard balls and causing dark matter particles to be ejected from the clouds by collisions or for dark matter blobs to change shape. The team also is looking to study collisions involving individual galaxies, which are much more common.
"There are still several viable candidates for dark matter, so the game is not over. But we are getting nearer to an answer," said Harvey. "These astronomically large particle colliders are finally letting us glimpse the dark world all around us, but just out of reach."
The Hubble Space Telescope is a project of international cooperation between NASA and ESA (European Space Agency). NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Maryland, manages the telescope. The Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) in Baltimore conducts Hubble science operations. STScI is operated for NASA by the Association of Universities for Research in Astronomy, Inc., in Washington.
NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, manages the Chandra program for NASA's Science Mission Directorate in Washington. The Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts, controls Chandra's science and flight operations.